Global Migration Studies in Rome


Image of Rome, Italy
This program is designed to explore the ethical, political, social, and economic implications of the European migration crisis.
Location: Rome, Italy
Language of Instruction: English
Term: Winter Break
Academic Disciplines: Humanities-Open to All Majors
Program Type: Faculty-led

  • This course foucses on current developments in European politices with respect to regular and illegal immigration, and especially on what is called the "borderization" of the Mediterranean. 
  • A series of experiential learning opportunities, including workshops with filmmakers, journalists, activists and leaders of non-governmental organizations as well as site visits to neighborhood initiatives, housing projects, local cooperatives, and museums will guide students as they explore the ethical implications that migration entails.
  • 3 Hour survival Italian course
  • Fulfills KU Core Goal 5.2

The Mediterranean basin has always been a space for human mobility and cultural exchange.  In recent years, several Mediterranean counties (such as Italy, Spain and Greece) have become the initial (and sometimes final) goal for large numbers of migrants and asylum-seekers attempting to enter the EU.  Transnational migration is a complex phenomenon that generates controversial social and political issues.  Through coursework, site visits, and interactions with non-governmental organizations, activists and immigrants, students will explore the political and sociological consequences of global migration on domestic policies in Italy, such as racism and anti-immigration practices.  Students will also see the positive results of effective measures to foster multiculturalism and integration.

Understanding the European Migrant Crisis (HUM 340) can be used to fulfill KU Core 5.2

After briefly discussing the history and the geography of human mobility across the Mediterranean, a space often represented as a “bridge” connecting people and cultures, we will focus on the current developments in European policies with respect to regular and illegal immigration, and especially on what is called the “borderization” of the Mediterranean. Concepts as “fortress Europe” and “shelter Europe” (and their implications) will be discussed. The main part of the course will explore the political and sociological consequences of global migration on domestic politics in Italy, focusing on issues such as racism, anti-immigration parties, and successful ways to deal with diversity. 

A series of experiential learning opportunities, including workshops with filmmakers, journalists, activists and leaders of non-governmental organizations as well as site visits to neighborhood initiatives, housing projects, local cooperatives, and museums will guide students as they explore the ethical implications that migration entails. Students will also take part in a three hour survival Italian course. Students will be responsible for writing two short response papers during the course.  A final project will be due one week after the program ends.

Student accommodations are double/triple occupancy rooms in a shared student residence.

  • Welcome meal upon arrival.
  • Overnight excursion to Naples, including a visit with Libera Terra. Students will meet with a member of Libera Terra’s Campania regional operations team and also visit a cooperative where one of their local partners uses confiscated mafia lands to provide shelter, job training and support to migrant communities.
  • Guest lectures and discussions with local authorities on global migration.
  • A workshop with a local faculty member exploring visual representations of Rome's changing demographic and cultural landscape.
  • Workshop with a representative from ANVCG, Rome-based NGO whose work and research centers on victims of civil conflict.
  • A guided "Day in the Life" walking tour with members of Rome's refugee community.
  • One free weekend for students to travel independently. 

SAGE is dedicated to creating international engagement opportunities that meet the needs of all our students and providing resources to support you through the process of studying abroad. Study abroad is achievable for students of all identities including our BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ students, students with disabilities, and students with religious/non-religious viewpoints. Before selecting a program, consider how your identities may impact your experience abroad in unique ways and talk with your Program Coordinator about any program-specific concerns. Students with documented disabilities should discuss any accommodation needs with their Program Coordinator early in the planning process.

Check our Identity Abroad page and resources listed below for information specific to you and other students who may be on your program.

Open to all undergraduate students from any accredited U.S. college or university. Minimum 2.5 GPA required (exceptions considered after submission of a petition).

Marike Janzen: Humanities Associate Professor

Bailey Hall, Room 205B

mjanzen@ku.edu